Plans unveiled for slender footbridge in London’s King’s Cross

Moxon Architects has published images of a proposed slender steel footbridge that is planned for the King’s Cross area of London in England. It has worked closely Arup on steel plate structure, which is just 15mm thick and yet will span a 38m gap without any intermediate support. This combined cycle and pedestrian bridge has been designed for the King’s Cross Central Development Partnership at its landmark project in King’s Cross. The bridge, which is currently at the planning stage, would span the Regent’s Canal between Camley Street and what will be known as Gasholder Gardens. It will provide a connection to the west and to the nearby area of Camden. Moxon described the bridge as being of extreme simplicity. It is shaped in response to structural demands with the minimum materials needed, said the firm. “In keeping with the great Victorian design in the nearby vicinity, the bridge is robust and unadorned, with the structure working as hard as possible.  Detail craftsmanship has been employed throughout, through a careful selection of materials and the minimalist shaping of key components that pedestrians will come into contact with.”  

Financing deal clears way for 887m-long Irish extradosed bridge

Financial close has been reached for an Irish road project that includes an 887m-long extradosed bridge. Ireland’s National Roads Authority – also known as Transport Infrastructure Ireland - and a BAM PPP PGGM Iridium consortium have completed the financing arrangements for the N25 New Ross Bypass public-private partnership scheme. The project, which involves a total investment of US$249.4 million, includes the River Barrow Crossing, a three-tower extradosed bridge linking Pink Point in County Kilkenny and Stokestown in County Wexford. The centre pier will extend approximately 25m above the bridge deck with the side piers reaching 15m. The two main central spans are approximately 230m long. The project's environmental statement describes the extradosed design as offering an elegant solution. The design was chosen as offering the best balance of overall performance against a dozen criteria including number of piers, construction programme, construction complexity, costs and aesthetic considerations. The scheme is the first in Ireland to be financed under the Project Bond Credit Enhancement financial structure, a joint initiative between the European Investment Bank and the European Commission. The inititative seeks to stimulate capital market financing for major infrastructure from institutional investors such as insurance companies and pension funds. Construction the N25 New Ross Bypass will be undertaken by a BAM Civil and Dragados Ireland joint venture, with work on site beginning in March. The bypass is due to come into use in January 2019 and there will be a 25-year concession period.

Canadian study rules out bridge to replace Gabriola Island ferries

A study by CH2M has concluded that the costs would outweigh the benefits of building a bridge to Gabriola Island in British Columbia, Canada. The feasibility study into the Gabriola Island Fixed Link says that, while a bridge appears to be technically feasible, it would not be a cost-effective alternative to the current ferry link to Vancouver Island. As a result, the government of British Columbia has announced that will not consider a fixed link to Gabriola Island at this time. “There is simply not enough compelling evidence to proceed with further work on a fixed link to Gabriola Island,” said transportation and infrastructure minister Todd Stone. “Our goal is ensure coastal communities are connected in an affordable, efficient and sustainable manner. This study shows that continuation of a coastal ferry service for Gabriola Island residents is the best way to achieve that goal.” CH2M Hill Canada was appointed in late 2014 to carry out the US$141,000 study, which examined alignments, road connections, construction cost, operation and maintenance costs, travel time, reliability and flexibility for potential users. It also includes an assessment of the socio-economic and environmental impacts of such a connection. Options were evaluated against the existing ferry service. The study’s remit did not include assessing the level of public support for a bridge. The study confirms that a number of combinations of possible road and bridge options exist, ranging in cost from US$182 million to US$367 million. The average estimated project cost is US$253 million, on which the business case was based. However, the costs outweigh the measured benefits. The study was commissioned in response to a petition signed by a significant number of Gabriola Island’s 4,000 full-time residents.

Three teams shortlisted for US-Canada bridge

The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) has named the three teams that will be invited to submit proposals for the Gordie Howe International Bridge project linking the USA and Canada. Legacy Link Partners, Bridging North America and CanAm Gateway Partners achieved the highest scores among the six teams vying to win the public-private partnership contract.  The teams include major international contractors and designers - see list below. The new Gordie Howe International Bridge will link Windsor in Ontario with Detroit in Michigan. Conceptual designs have been produced for both cable-stayed and suspension alternatives. “With the short-listed respondents named, WDBA is pleased to have concluded the first stage in the public-private partnership procurement process,” said WDBA president and CEO Michael Cautillo. “Our team of dedicated staff, partners and consultants have worked diligently to implement a fair and transparent process that recognises the size and scope of this unprecedented international project. We are in the process of finalising the request for proposals which will be issued to the short-listed respondents in the near term.” Legacy Link Partners SNC Lavalin Capital VINCI Concessions John Laing Investments HDR Corp Leonhardt, Andra and Partners (if cable-stayed) Aas-Jakobsen (if suspension) Alfred Benesch & Company Golder American Bridge Canada SNC Lavalin Constructor (Pacific) Vinci Construction Grands Projets Barton Malow DRICCA (joint venture with Ajax Paving, Dan's Excavating, CA Hull Co, Toebe Construction, Amico Infrastructures) SNC Lavalin Operations & Maintenance Vinci Concessions SNC Lavalin Security Consulting   Bridging North America ACS Infrastructure Canada Fluor Canada Aecon Concessions, a division of Aecon Construction Group RBC Dominion Securities Aecom Carlos Fernandez Casado/FHECOR Ingenieros Consultores Moriyama and Teshima Architects Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects Dragados Canada Aecon Infrastructure Management Turner Construction Company Aecon O&M, a division of Aecon Construction Group DBI Services URS Federal Services (an Aecom company)    CanAm Gateway Partners Fengate Capital Management BBGI CanHoldco EllisDon Capital Bechtel Development Company Arup-Hatch Mott McDonald Design JV Bergmann Associates NORR Bechtel Canada EllisDon Civil Traylor Bros EllisDon Facilities Services Egis Projects Roy Jorgensen Associates   

L&T and Daewoo scoop contract for River Ganga bridge

A joint venture of L&T Construction and Daewoo E&C has won a US$460 million contract to design and build a 9.76km extradosed bridge over the River Ganga in the Indian state of Bihar. The contract for Bihar State Road Development Corporation Limited (BSRDCL) is for a 22km section of road, including the six-lane bridge over the River Ganga, also known as the Ganges. The project is scheduled to take four years. “This is a significant win in the heavy civil infrastructure space and we hope that this is a sign for many such projects involving vital infrastructure that are in the offing to materialise,” said SN Subrahmanyan, deputy managing director and president of L&T.

Australia allocates funding for 164 bridge upgrades

The Australian government has allocated US$69 million for upgrades to 164 bridges across the country. The series of small projects will be carried out under the second round of the Bridges Renewal Programme. Typical projects include replacing timber bridges with concrete structures, upgrading culverts and changing a bridge alignment to avoid problems during floods. Acting prime minister Warren Truss said that the new programme is proving very popular, with the second round seeing a significant increase in the number and quality of applications from local governments. “We understand that local government has responsibility for thousands of local bridges, many of which are in a poor state of repair,” he said. “Some councils face critical bridge issues beyond their capacity to address. By upgrading these bridges, residents will enjoy better, safer and more reliable road access. Freight from farms and local factories will also be able to pass more safely along quicker routes, improving their productivity." The government has committed a total of US$206 million in funding for the programme over five years, starting from 2014–15.

Canada’s research council to investigate Nipigon River Bridge problems

Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation has brought in the National Research Council of Canada to help determine the cause of last week’s major mechanical failure at the new Nipigon River Bridge. The bridge was temporarily completely closed following the sudden bolt failure, which resulted in the western edge of the cable-stayed span rising by about 600mm at the expansion joint (link opens in new tab). The bridge was subsequently reopened to single-lane traffic after the deck was brought back into alignment. The research and technology organisation will investigate the problems with the bridge, which is a key connection in the Trans-Canada highway. Specialists will analyse some of the damaged bolts and take them to Ottawa for further testing. Failure analysis will be carried out on the bolts used to hold together two sections of the cable-stay bridge. Work will begin with fracture surface evaluation as well as tests on the metallurgical composition and verification of mechanical properties to check conformity with ASTM standards. “We are pleased to work with Ontario's Ministry of Transportation to analyse the conditions that led to the bolts' failure on the Nipigon River Bridge,” said Richard Tremblay, general manager of construction at the National Research Council of Canada. “The National Research Council is deploying its best industry-leading experts in materials analysis and critical infrastructure and advanced equipment to arrive at a timely, safe, and lasting solution for Canadians using this important trade corridor.”

Contractor picked for Serbia’s Sava River Bridge

A joint venture of Strabag, Züblin and Dywidag has signed a contract with Serbia’s roads authority to build a bridge over the Sava River. The 1,964m-long bridge near Ostruznica is part of the Belgrade bypass project. It will cost US$31.5m to build and the work is due to take 26 months. The contract also includes associated road works, lighting, telecoms and landscaping as well as stormwater drainage and treatment.

Concrete cracks force closure of new Tennessee bridge

A bridge that has been in use for only a year has been closed for upgrades after cracks developed in the concrete pier caps. New columns are to be added to boost support for the deck. The bridge over the Caney Fork River in the US state of Tennessee is to remain closed while the additional work takes place. Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) began construction of the US 70 North (SR 24) bridge in late 2012 as part of a project to replace the old truss-style structure. It was opened about a year ago. For several months, TDOT construction personnel and bridge inspectors, along with the contractor Concrete Structures, have been monitoring hairline cracks that developed in the concrete pier caps. TDOT said that it was normal for some cracking to occur but that in this instance multiple cracks have developed on several of the pier caps that support the bridge’s deck. It has therefore decided to increase the bridge’s support system. Additional columns will be added on each side of the seven existing piers. This approach will not require any part of the new bridge to be taken down or replaced. The goal is to restore traffic to the bridge within 90 days.

Concrete cracks force closure of new Tennessee bridge

A bridge that has been in use for only a year has been closed for upgrades after cracks developed in the concrete pier caps. New columns are to be added to boost support for the deck. The bridge over the Caney Fork River in the US state of Tennessee is to remain closed while the additional work takes place. Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) began construction of the US 70 North (SR 24) bridge in late 2012 as part of a project to replace the old truss-style structure. It was opened about a year ago. For several months, TDOT construction personnel and bridge inspectors, along with the contractor Concrete Structures, have been monitoring hairline cracks that developed in the concrete pier caps. TDOT said that it was normal for some cracking to occur but that in this instance multiple cracks have developed on several of the pier caps that support the bridge’s deck. It has therefore decided to increase the bridge’s support system. Additional columns will be added on each side of the seven existing piers. This approach will not require any part of the new bridge to be taken down or replaced. The goal is to restore traffic to the bridge within 90 days.

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As part of a great Design/Build team Fine Tuned Structures project North Carolina Real Estate Property won the 2017 ICF Builder Magazine Award for best residential project in the World. We are proud for being a member of an award winning team.... Read more

Fine Tuned Structures recently completed the design of new apartment building in downtown Charleston, South Carolina